VIA

Overview
The VIA cellular bone matrices are viable allogeneic bone allografts intended for use in bone remodeling. Each VIA product contains the three key elements that are ideal for bone formation:

  • An osteoconductive three-dimensional scaffold with cortical and cancellous components.
  • A demineralized bone scaffold with osteoinductive potential which provides exposure of signaling molecules and bone morphogenetic proteins.1
  • Bone-derived cells to support osteogenic healing processes.

The VIA product line is prepared with a novel DMSO-free cryoprotectant, which provides dependable cell identity and the ability to sustain cell viability post-thaw. Final preparation of the cell and bone components yields a product that provides osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic properties to enhance the patient’s innate healing response.

Key Features

  • Four (4) unique scaffold blends for optimal handling characteristics: VIA Graft, VIA Graft Moldable, VIA Form, VIA Form Moldable.
  • Proprietary, optimized bone microparticulate size range of 100-300 µm.2
  • Novel DMSO-free cryoprotectant, with no rinsing and decanting steps required prior to use.
  • Convenient handling and preparation in the OR, with total preparation time on the back table less than 20 minutes.
  • Four (4) hour working window for implantation after thaw without loss of cell viability.
  • Product shelf-life is two (2) years from date of processing when stored at -65°C or colder.

 Potential Clinical Applications

  • Spine
  • Upper Extremity
  • Foot and Ankle
  • Oral and Maxillofacial
  • Orthopaedic Oncology

VIA Graft


SIZE
1.0cc
2.5cc
5.0cc
10cc

CODE
VCAX-010000
VCAX-025000
VCAX-050000
VCAX-100000

VIA Graft Moldable


SIZE
2.5cc
5.0cc
10cc

CODE
VCAMX-025000
VCAMX-050000
VCAMX-100000

VIA Form


SIZE
2.5cc
5.0cc
10cc

CODE
VCAFX-025000
VCAFX-050000
VCAFX-100000

VIA Form Moldable


SIZE
2.5cc
5.0cc
10cc

CODE
VCAFMX-025000
VCAFMX-050000
VCAFMX-100000

References

  1. Gruskin, E. et.al., Demineralized bone matrix in bone repair: history and use. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 2012. 64:1063-1077.
  2. Malinin, T.I., et. al., Particulate bone allograft incorporation in regeneration of osseous defects; importance of particle sizes. The Open Orthopeadics Journal, 2007. 1:19-24.